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Former NVSL Postdoc Wins Best Paper Award at OSDI'18

Dr. Yiying Zhang (who was a post-doc in the NVSL until not too long ago) won the best paper award at OSDI 2018 this year for her group's paper "LegoOS: A Disseminated, Distributed OS for Hardware Resource Disaggregation".  Here's the abstract:

The monolithic server model where a server is the unit of deployment, operation, and failure is meeting its limits in the face of several recent hardware and application trends. To improve heterogeneity, elasticity, resource utilization, and failure handling in datacenters, we believe that datacenters should break monolithic servers into disaggregated, network-attached hardware components. Despite the promising benefits of hardware resource disaggregation, no existing OSes or software systems can properly manage it. We propose a new OS model called the split kernel to manage disaggregated systems. Splitkernel disseminates traditional OS functionalities into loosely-coupled monitors, each of which runs on and manages a hardware component. Using the splitkernel model, we built LegoOS, a new OS designed for hardware resource disaggregation. LegoOS appears to users as a set of distributed servers. Internally, LegoOS cleanly separates processor, memory, and storage devices both at the hardware level and the OS level. We implemented LegoOS from scratch and evaluated it by emulating hardware components using commodity servers. Our evaluation results show that LegoOS’s performance is comparable to monolithic Linux servers, while largely improving resource packing and failure rate over monolithic clusters.


Morteza Wins Best Paper Award

Morteza Hoseinzadeh's work at Samsung over the summer won the Best Paper Award at IPCCC 2017.  The work focuses on optimizing the performance of NVMe storage systems in the cloud.   Morteza's collaborators include Professor Ningfang Mi and PhD students, Zhengyu Yang and Janki Bhimani from Northeastern University.  Well done, Morteza!


Engineering Reliable Persistence @ ACM SIGARCH Blog

Integrating non-volatile main memories (NVMMs) into the storage/memory hierarchy make data integrity a critical design consideration.  Protecting data in NVMM is a complex problem:  media errors and software bugs can corrupt data and the reliability of each memory cell degrades as it is used, potentially leading to premature failure.  Hardware and software both have a role to play, but trying to solve problems in the wrong place can needlessly complicate the system, leave the system open to data corruption, and/or sacrifice performance.Read more


Andiry Presents NOVA-Fortis at SOSP in Shanghai

Andiry described building the world's first fault-tolerant non-volatile main memory file system at SOSP'17 in Shanghai.  The resulting file system -- NOVA-fortis -- provides a mechanism to take consistent snapshots to facilitate backups and protects both metadata and file data from media and software errors.  Here's the full paper.

While he was on the continent, Andiry is also presenting NOVA at Tsinghua University, Wuhan university, and Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

Well done, NOVA hackers!


NOVA in the Linux Weekly News

The NOVA file system was recently written up in the Linux Weekly News.

NOVA's goal is to provide a high-performance, full-featured, production-ready file system tailored for byte-addressable non-volatile memories (e.g., NVDIMMs and Intel's soon-to-be-released 3DXpoint DIMMs). It combines design elements from many other file systems to provide a combination of high-performance, strong consistency guarantees, and comprehensive data protection.

LWN Article

 


A Vision of Persistence @ ACM SIGARCH Blog

For decades, memory systems have relied on DRAM for capacity, SRAMs for speed and then turned programmers loose with malloc(), free(), and pthreads to build an amazing array of useful, carefully tuned, composable, and remarkably useful data structures.  However, these data structures have been transient — swept away by the next reboot or system crash.  To build something that lasts, programmers have worked with clunkier interfaces — open(), close(), read(), write() — to access glacially slow spinning or, lately, solid-state disks.

But things are about to change.Read more


Graduation Party!

NVSL students family and friends joined newly minted Drs. Yang "Robert" Liu, Meenakshi Sundaram Bhaskaran, Michael Wei, and Yanqin Jin for lunch before the graduation ceremony. We were especially happy to have so mayn of their parents and family members in attenance.

Another NVSL alumn, Akshatha Gangadharaiah, was also in the graduation ceremony.

Best of luck to all of you, and thank you for all your hard work! We will miss you!


Hung Wei is a Professor at NCSU!

Our own Hung Wei Tseng has just started his new position at North Carolina State University.  Hung Wei did his PhD at UCSD with Dean Tullsen and then joined my group as a post-doc.

Congratulations, Hung Wei!

 


Congratulations Professor Zhang!

Dr. Yiying Zhang has just completed her post-doc in the NVSL and has moved to Purdue as an Assistant Professor.  Hurray!


Michael Wei Receives NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

The NSF awards these fellowships across science, engineering, and math-related disciplines. They are very prestigious.

From the NSF web site: The National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees at accredited US institutions.

Way to go, Michael!