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PIRL Blog Launches

Following the success of the inaugural Persistent in Real Life workshop (PIRL'19), we've launched a blog focused on how to build systems using persistent memory. Check it out.


Kunal Goes to PODC

Newly minted Ph.D. and NVSL alumnus Dr. Kunal Korgaonkar jetted to Toronto to present his work on scalable, distributed algorithms that provide a path to realize large persistent memory systems. The work was presented at ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing (PODC) ‘19  - a flagship distributed computing conference. After graduating last spring, Kunal has taken a position as a postdoctoral research fellow at Technion (Israel) where he is working on building real in-memory computing systems from the ground up.


My Quadcopter Class is Going to SIGGRAPH

I'm presenting my paper describing a class in which students build a quadcopter from scratch at SIGGRAPH next week in LA. If you want to build your own, the materials are all on github.


First PIRL Conference Wraps Up

The Non-Volatile Systems Lab (in conjunction with SNIA) hosted the first Persistent Programming In Real Life (PIRL) conference earlier this week. PIRL is a small meeting of software developers on the front lines of understanding how to use new persistent memory technologies.

We had stellar slate of speakers and keynotes from industry and academia. You can check out all the detail at the PIRL website.


NVSL Publishes First Characterization of Intel 3DXPoint DIMMs

This week we released the full version of our report detailing the performance of Intel's 3DXPoint DIMMs (technically "Intel DC Optane Memory Modules").

The key takeaway is that these DIMMs are not just 'slower, persistent DRAM'. They have their own idiosyncrasies that programmers will have to wrestle with.


Engineering Reliable Persistence @ ACM SIGARCH Blog

Integrating non-volatile main memories (NVMMs) into the storage/memory hierarchy make data integrity a critical design consideration.  Protecting data in NVMM is a complex problem:  media errors and software bugs can corrupt data and the reliability of each memory cell degrades as it is used, potentially leading to premature failure.  Hardware and software both have a role to play, but trying to solve problems in the wrong place can needlessly complicate the system, leave the system open to data corruption, and/or sacrifice performance.Read more


Andiry Presents NOVA-Fortis at SOSP in Shanghai

Andiry described building the world's first fault-tolerant non-volatile main memory file system at SOSP'17 in Shanghai.  The resulting file system -- NOVA-fortis -- provides a mechanism to take consistent snapshots to facilitate backups and protects both metadata and file data from media and software errors.  Here's the full paper.

While he was on the continent, Andiry is also presenting NOVA at Tsinghua University, Wuhan university, and Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

Well done, NOVA hackers!


NOVA in the Linux Weekly News

The NOVA file system was recently written up in the Linux Weekly News.

NOVA's goal is to provide a high-performance, full-featured, production-ready file system tailored for byte-addressable non-volatile memories (e.g., NVDIMMs and Intel's soon-to-be-released 3DXpoint DIMMs). It combines design elements from many other file systems to provide a combination of high-performance, strong consistency guarantees, and comprehensive data protection.

LWN Article

 


A Vision of Persistence @ ACM SIGARCH Blog

For decades, memory systems have relied on DRAM for capacity, SRAMs for speed and then turned programmers loose with malloc(), free(), and pthreads to build an amazing array of useful, carefully tuned, composable, and remarkably useful data structures.  However, these data structures have been transient — swept away by the next reboot or system crash.  To build something that lasts, programmers have worked with clunkier interfaces — open(), close(), read(), write() — to access glacially slow spinning or, lately, solid-state disks.

But things are about to change.Read more


Graduation Party!

NVSL students family and friends joined newly minted Drs. Yang "Robert" Liu, Meenakshi Sundaram Bhaskaran, Michael Wei, and Yanqin Jin for lunch before the graduation ceremony. We were especially happy to have so mayn of their parents and family members in attenance.

Another NVSL alumn, Akshatha Gangadharaiah, was also in the graduation ceremony.

Best of luck to all of you, and thank you for all your hard work! We will miss you!